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APOCALYPSE NOW: Rare astrological event TONIGHT could herald the 'End of Days'
April 09, 2014
end of the world. end of days, bible, jesus, jesus christ, jews, blood red moon, red moon, eclipse, blood red eclipse, sun, mars, earth, tetrad
The alignment marks the start of the 'Tetrad' - four successive 'blood-red' eclipses[AFP/GETTY ]

Mars, Earth, and the Sun will all align tonight, a rare 'opposition of the planets' that only happens once every 778 days. 

But what makes this so remarkable is that it comes precisely a week before everyone on earth will see the first of FOUR dark red 'blood moons', an extraordinary event some Christians believe represents the End of Days and the second coming of Christ.

The King James Bible predicts: "The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and the terrible day of the LORD comes," [Joel 2:31]. 

And, according to NASA, a highly unusual 'Tetrad' - four successive total 'blood-red' lunar eclipses each followed by six full moons - will, indeed, start a week today and finish on September 28 next year. 

The incredible alignment has only happened a handful of times in the last two thousand years but, remarkably, on each of the last three occasions it has coincided with a globally significant religious event.

 
Blood moon & apocalypse woes: Bible scripture cites world end?
April 03, 2014
blood moon apocalypse 2014

When the blood moon appears this month it may strike you as looking wounded. The blood moon will be drenched in a deep red hue, almost resembling the color of blood. This event has a significant link to the apocalypse that was deciphered from a bible scripture, according to some religious leaders.

While folks might have had their full of promises of the coming apocalypse, today two pastors have cited a scripture that calls for the presence of a blood moon during the apocalypse, according to The Inquisitr on April 2.

The blood moon on April 15 will be the first of four that the Earth will experience in the next two years. This extremely uncommon grouping of four blood red moon events is called a tetrad. Coinciding with Passover and the Feast of Tabernacles, these blood moon events are expected in April of 2014 and 2015, along with October of 2014 and 2015.

 
Papal Election Triggers Doomsday Theories
March 12, 2013
Saint Malachy Pope Doomsday
The beginning of papal conclave to elect a new head of the Catholic Church has some people worrying the end is nigh. These believers interpret two medieval-era prophecies to mean that the next pope elected will be the last before doomsday. One prophecy allegedly comes from a 12th-century archbishop, the other from no less famed a name than Nostradamus himself. Both could be charitably described as "open to interpretation."

The first set of prophecies, known as the Saint Malachy prophecies, are allegedly written by the saint himself, an archbishop in the 1100s. However, these prophecies weren't published until 1595, when a Benedictine monk claimed to have found them; the Catholic Church does not consider them to be from Saint Malachy's pen.
 
Saint Malachy's "Last Pope" Prophecy Could Outdo 2012 Hype?
February 13, 2013
Saint Malachy Pope Prophecy
Just when you thought it was safe to go out of the bunker, there's a fresh wave of doomsday buzz over a purported 12th-century prophecy suggesting that the next pope will be the last pope before the end of the world. St. Malachy's "Prophecy of the Popes " has no credence in the Roman Catholic Church, but its effect could well be longer-lasting than the hype that surrounded the 2012 Maya apocalypse  — especially if the papal conclave goes with one of the favored candidates for Benedict XVI's successor.

The text that's been attributed to Malachy came to light in 1595, in a book by Benedictine monk Arnold de Wyon. Supposedly, Malachy experienced a vision of future popes during a trip to Rome in 1139, and wrote down a series of 112 cryptic phrases that described each pope in turn. The text was said to have lain unnoticed in Rome's archives until Wyon published it.

Doomsday fans have found ways to link each phrase to a corresponding pope through the centuries. That includes John Paul II, who is associated with phrase No. 110, "From the labor of the sun," because he was born on the day of a solar eclipse and was entombed on the day of a solar eclipse as well. Benedict XVI, No. 111, is supposedly "glory of the olive" because some members of a branch of the monastic order founded by St. Benedict are known as Olivetans.
 
Hurricane Sandy Blamed On Gays, Obama And Romney By Preacher John McTernan
October 29, 2012
Hurricane Sandy Gays
The Eastern seaboard may have yet to experience the full wrath of Hurricane Sandy, but one right-wing Christian preacher is already pointing the finger at the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community.

In a wordy and occasionally rambling blog on his website, chaplain John McTernan seems to link Hurricane Sandy (and a number of other recent weather-related trends and natural disasters) on LGBT people and President Barack Obama's recent backing of marriage equality. While most of McTernan's wrath is directed at Obama, he has some choice words for GOP candidate Mitt Romney, too.

"God is systematically destroying America," McTernan writes. "Just look at what has happened this year."
 
'Doomsday' minister quiet on 2012 forecast
December 29, 2011
doomsday minister

The year 2011 has flown by without a hitch … or, at least, without Earth bursting into flames. Radio evangelist Harold Camping's famous pair of prophecies -- his prediction that true Christians would be safely evacuated to heaven on May 21, and that a series of global cataclysms would then climax in a grand, Earth-shattering finale on Oct. 21 -- seem to have flopped. (Imagine my shock)

Yes, it looks as if we'll make it to 2012 after all. But what then?

Camping himself doesn't have much to say on the subject. After the crash-and-burn of his Oct. 21 endtimes prediction , the 90-year-old minister retired from Family Radio Network -- the Christian talk show he co-founded in 1958 -- and stepped away from the limelight. According to Susan Espinoza, a Family Radio spokeswoman, Camping "is not predicting any new dates for the end of the world."

 
Christian Prayer Requests
November 17, 2011
Christian Prayer Center - We're a Christian community where people come to post their prayer requests and have other readers pray for them.
 
Who's Waiting : Second Coming of Jesus (Infographic)
October 23, 2011

Religion and doom seem to go hand in hand - at least for some believers. Harold Camping, who preaches on Family Radio, has a history of end-of-world predictions , though they have all fallen flat as the doomsdays have come and gone.

His latest, following a forecast of Judgment Day to take place this past May 21, is that the world will end today (Oct. 21). Things have been pretty quiet so far.

While Camping shows an extreme view of the end, belief in an eventual apocalypse is not uncommon in the United States, according to a Pew Research Center survey. The 2006 survey revealed 79 percent of U.S. Christians say they believe in the second coming of Jesus Christ, and 20 percent believe the second coming will happen in their lifetimes.

These "second coming" beliefs are generally tied with an end-of-the-world scenario. Thinking the end is near may actually be comforting to some, say sociologists. For instance, a belief in doomsday may give followers a clear sense of the world and their place in it. Such apocalyptic worldviews may also stem from an overwhelming feeling that one's problems are too big, and, as such, the only possible solution is a clean slate.

Whatever the reasons, these religious apocalypse forecasts all lead to a deflating aftermath, as believers struggle to cope with a doomsday no-show.

second coming of jesus
 
Dear Harrold Camping : Worst. Apocalypse. Ever.
October 21, 2011
harold camping doomsday

Once again, the world failed to end, despite a high-profile prediction from a radio preacher in California.

Harold Camping, the 90-year-old leader of Family Radio International, stirred a global frenzy when he predicted that the Rapture would take 200 million Christians to heaven on May 21. When the Rapture didn't occur, Camping said he got his Bible-based calculations wrong and revised his prophecy to set the world's end on Friday, Oct. 21.

But as Friday morphed into Saturday around the world, there was no sign that doomsday had come. Two moderate quakes jolted the San Francisco Bay area on Thursday, and floods threatened to swamp Bangkok, but no world-shattering changes took place — sparking this typical Twitter refrain: "Dear Harold Camping, Worst. Apocalypse. Ever."

 
Shelved Doomsday Due Friday... again
October 18, 2011
harold camping doomsday october 21

On Friday, Oct. 21, 2011, the Rapture will be upon us. That's according to U.S. Christian broadcaster Harold Camping anyway.

Yes, that's the same Mr. Camping who "predicted" doom on May 21. But, as far as I'm aware, we're still here. So, Oct. 21 is the new Rapture. Right.

Postponing doomsday is not uncommon amongst doomsayers (religious or otherwise), especially when the original day of doom doesn't happen. And for Camping, "Doomsday Deferral" seems to be a fun trick he likes to play. He did, after all, also predict doomsday in 1994. [fox]
 
End of World Coming October 21st - Harold Camping... again
October 15, 2011
harold camping doomsday prophecy prediction
Here we go again.... *sigh*

The radio preacher who predicted Judgment Day on May 21 has not backed down from his claims that the end of the world is near, despite the lack of a Rapture or world-devastating earthquakes leading up to the doomsday.

In an announcement on his Family Radio Network website, Harold Camping stands by his earlier predictions that the world will end on Friday, Oct. 21. Originally, Camping had predicted hourly earthquakes and God's judgment on May 21, to be followed by months of torment on Earth for those individuals left behind. Using numerical codes extracted from the Bible, Camping set the date for the end of everything for Oct. 21. [ See: Whoops! Failed Armageddon ]

When May 21 came and went without fanfare, Camping revised his story. The "earthquakes" he had predicted did occur, he writes on his website in a post titled "What Happened on May 21?" — only instead of shaking the Earth, God shook mankind "with fear." Likewise, although no one was raptured, God is no longer saving souls, Camping writes.

 
Here we go again - Harold Camping : Rapture Will 'Probably' Finish Oct. 21
October 06, 2011
harold camping repture october 21 2011
Harold Camping, the Christian broadcaster who boldly announced that the world would end on May 21, only to later say that he was "flabbergasted" when the rapture did not occur, is now telling everyone to get ready for the real rapture, which is set to occur on Oct. 21 – probably.

Some time after being released from a nursing home in June after suffering a stroke, Camping, released an audio message on Family Radio's website saying, "We would have not been able to be used [by God] to bring about the tremendous event that occurred on May 21 of this year, which probably [will] be finished out on Oct. 21 that's coming very shortly. That looks like it will be ... the final end of everything."

Camping, not sounding quite as strong in his voice or as confident about his rapture prediction in his audio message, expressed gratitude for prayers from supporters (read a transcript of Camping's audio message).

 
If intelligent extraterrestrials exist, what about God?
October 02, 2011
intelligent aliens vs jesus
The discovery of intelligent aliens would be mind-blowing in many respects, but it could present a special dilemma for the world's religions, theologians pondering interstellar travel concepts said Saturday.

Christians, in particular, might take the news hardest, because the Christian belief system does not easily allow for other intelligent beings in the universe, Christian thinkers said at the 100 Year Starship Symposium, a meeting sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to discuss issues surrounding traveling to other stars.

In other words, "Did Jesus die for Klingons too?" as philosophy professor Christian Weidemann of Germany's Ruhr-University Bochum titled his talk at a panel on the philosophical and religious considerations of visiting other worlds.  According to Christianity, an historic event some 2,000 years ago was supposed to save the whole of creation," Weidemann said. "You can grasp the conflict." 

Here's how the debate goes: If the whole of creation includes 125 billion galaxies with hundreds of billions of stars in each, as astronomers think, then what if some of these stars have planets with advanced civilizations, too? Why would Jesus Christ have come to Earth, of all the inhabited planets in the universe, to save Earthlings and abandon the rest of God's creatures? [MSNBC]

 
Pat Robertson : Crack in Washington Monument...
August 27, 2011

Pat Robertson: Crack In Washington Monument A Sign From God, Earthquake Signals Coming Of Christ

Televangelist Pat Robertson suggested Wednesday that cracks in the Washington Monument caused by the August 23 earthquake could be a sign from God, and the natural disaster “means that we’re closer to the coming of the Lord.”

To explain the rare east coast quake, Robertson pointed to the Biblical prophecy of the end of the world, which claims there could be potential devastation from natural disasters leading up to Jesus' return to Earth.

On his television show, "The 700 Club," Robertson said:

"I don't want to get weird on this, so please take it for what it's worth, but it seems to me the Washington Monument is a symbol of America's power. It has been the symbol of our great nation, we look at that monument and we say this is one nation under God. Now there's a crack in it."

"Is that a sign from the Lord? Is that something that has significance, or is it just the result of an earthquake?" Robertson asked his viewers.

 
End Times? Texas Lake Turns Blood-Red
August 02, 2011

A Texas lake that turned blood-red this summer may not be a sign of the End Times, but probably is the end of a popular fishing and recreation spot.

A drought has left the OC Fisher Reservoir in San Angelo State Park in West Texas almost entirely dry. The water that is left is stagnant, full of dead fish — and a deep, opaque red.

The color has some apocalypse believers suggesting that OC Fisher is an early sign of the end of the world, but Texas Parks and Wildlife Inland Fisheries officials say the bloody look is the result of Chromatiaceae bacteria, which thrive in oxygen-deprived water.

"It's just heartbreaking," said Charles Cruz, a fish and wildlife technician with Texas Parks and Wildlife in San Angelo, Tex.

 
Storms killed 4th in Ark.; toll at 14
May 25, 2011
storm damage tornado hail natural disaster

A violent storm system rumbled through the central U.S. on Wednesday, spawning tornadoes that turned homes into splintered wreckage, killing at least 14 people and hampering rescue efforts in a city slammed by a massive twister days earlier.

The new system, which followed closely behind the one that spawned the massive twister that struck Joplin, Mo., and killed more than 120 people, moved into the Oklahoma City area Tuesday evening as worried commuters rushed home from work.

Several tornadoes touched down in Oklahoma City and its suburbs, killing at least eight people and injuring at least 70 others, authorities said. Among those killed was a 15-month-old boy, and searchers were looking for his missing 3-year-old brother. [ yahoo ]

 
Failed Doomsday Has Real Deadly Consequences
May 24, 2011
failed doomsday apocalypse rapture armageddon disaster

Harold Camping, the 89-year-old leader whose study of the Bible convinced him and his followers that the world would end, has been described by his wife as "flabbergasted" that the apocalypse didn’t start over the weekend. There are some red faces out there. And if that's all it had been, then one could argue no great harm had been done.

But while Camping and his followers try to figure out what went wrong (or right) — with news Monday night that he now says Judgment Day will come on Oct. 21 — the failed prophecy did more than just damage Camping's credibility: It also appears to have caused death and serious injury to true believers. [ yahoo ]

 
Not again! October 21st now "doomsday"
May 24, 2011

All warnings of the end of the world have apparently been "raptured" off the homepage of a doomsday preacher who wrongly predicted the return of Jesus over the weekend, and made a new prediction tonight that the end would now come on Oct. 21 of this year.

For many months, Oakland, Calif.-based Family Radio and its main voice Harold Camping had been thundering warnings that Judgment Day was to take place May 21, 2011, and that it would be a certainty with "no Plan B."

 
Really? Doomsday prophet, followers ‘flabbergasted’ world didn’t end
May 23, 2011
harold camping failed doomsday armageddon apocalypse prediction
It's hard to feel bad for someone whose doomsday predictions caused so much anxiety, but 89-year-old Harold Camping's recent admission that he's "flabbergasted" the world didn't end last weekend sounds somewhat pitiful.

"It has been a really tough weekend," Camping said Sunday, after emerging from his Alameda, California home for the first time to talk to a reporter from the San Francisco Chronicle. "I'm looking for answers ... But now I have nothing else to say," he said, adding that he would make a full statement today.

Camping's PR aide, Tom Evans, told the L.A. Times that the group is "disappointed" that 200 million true believers weren't lifted up to heaven on Saturday while everyone else suffered and eventually died as a series of earthquakes and famine destroyed the Earth. "You can imagine we're pretty disappointed, but the word of God is still true," Evans said. "We obviously went too far, and that's something we need to learn from." The group posted 2,000 billboards around the country warning of the rapture, while Camping--an uncertified fundamentalist minister--spread the word on his radio show. [ yahoo ]

 
When Doomsday Isn't, Believers Struggle to Cope
May 21, 2011
2011 may 21 disaster armageddon apocalypse doomsday

If you're reading this, Harold Camping's predictions that the end of the world would start Saturday (May 21) failed to pan out.

That's good news for most of us, but Camping and his followers were looking forward to the end. After all, they believed that they were likely to be among the 200 million souls sent to live in paradise forever. So how do believers cope when their doomsday predictions fail?

It depends, said Lorenzo DiTommaso, a professor of religion at Concordia University in Montreal who studies the history of doomsday prediction. [ livescience ]

 
May 21st - Misery loves company
May 20, 2011

Its seems that down through the ages that every generation has its doomsday prophet, some person who has the inside track with God. And not content to stand on the street corner and proclaim the end is near, he (or she) needs a group to justify the prophecy.

We have had countless religious groups this last 200 years bent on gathering up the naive from every corner of the globe and leading them to the promised land, or at least fleecing them for their worldly goods along the way. And at best they end up broke and scattered to the wind, or the worse case scenario, dead.

The profile fits the majority of these individuals, in as much that they know how to prey on the weak minded by proclaiming themselves the true voice of God, and holding absolute control over their flock with rules and regulations that forbid questioning any authority. This tactic is a trade mark of cults and sects, effectively removing the identity of its members and their ability to think for themselves.

Segregation from the world at large is also part of the strategy, convincing the group that the world is evil, and that the only way to see heaven is to remain in the security of the cult, believing only in the words divinely given to its prophet leader, using the fear of damnation as the consequence for questioning its authority.

Remarkably its this fear that strips away the logic from otherwise intelligent people, allowing them to blindly follow the orders and commands, even when common sense and logic paint another picture. And when the rest of the world questions to this mentality, the self made prophet simply proclaims it as the work of the devil.

Religion is built on this fear, rather than the promised peace and goodwill that should be the result of adherence to a divine message, and sadly it drives the blind believers to commit the ultimate act in the name of their faith by killing off their neighbor.

Misery does indeed love company.

[ message boards ]

 
What happens if 200 Million People Go Missing Tomorrow?
May 20, 2011
may 21 rapture doomsday armageddon apocalypse

According to the predictions of Christian radio broadcaster Harold Camping, May 21 will be the day of the rapture, when God calls believers to heaven to live in everlasting paradise. By Camping's estimation, that means the Earth will be 200 million souls lighter by Sunday morning.

While there's no reason to believe that Camping's doomsday predictions are more reliable than the hundreds of failed end-of-the-world predictions throughout history, the loss of 200 million people all at once would be the largest single population decrease in human history. It's safe to say the world would take notice - but the effects of such a mass disappearance would depend on where believers were concentrated.

 
'Rapture Parties' Planned to Celebrate Doomsday Saturday May 21
May 19, 2011
harold camping rapture may 21 2011

With the end of the world looming this Saturday (May 21st), non-believers are planning "Rapture parties" to poke a little fun at the Doomsday prediction and also raise awareness for other causes.

Harold Camping, 89-year-old leader of the ministry Family Radio Worldwide, has predicted that a five-month destruction of humanity will commence Saturday with a Rapture, in which believers will ascend to heaven. "Whereas this five-month period will be an enormous horror story for those who have not been raptured, it will be a time of great joy and wonder for those who are raptured," according to the Family Radio website.

Camping uses a mathematical formula linked to prophecies in the Bible. He once predicted Sept. 6, 1994 as Judgment Day, but that math didn't quite work out . This time around, Camping's organization took out an ad in Reader's Digest, stating: "The Bible guarantees the end of the world will begin with Judgment Day May 21, 2011."

 
The Draw of Doomsday: Why People Look Forward to the End
May 17, 2011
doomsday armageddon apocalypse

Most people go through their daily lives assuming that tomorrow will be a lot like today. No pits of fire will open up, society won't collapse, and the world, most likely, won't end.

But for others, doom has a certain appeal.

The most famous example these days is Harold Camping, a California-based Christian radio broadcaster who believes that May 21, 2011, will mark Judgment Day, ushering in five months of torment for the unsaved until the universe finally ends on Oct. 21.  Camping has bought billboards and dispatched caravans of believers around the country, warning the world of its fate.

"It's going to be a wonderful, wonderful day," Camping told a San Francisco Chronicle reporter last June.

Camping has made this prediction before, in 1994 — it didn't pan out — but the thousands of failed doomsday predictions throughout history are no match for what Lorenzo DiTommaso, a professor of religion at Concordia University in Montreal, calls the "apocalyptic worldview."

 
May 21 - Another Doomsday Upon Us?
May 17, 2011
may 21 doomsday armageddon apocalypse

Doomsday prophets are often depicted in cartoons as bearded, robed men standing on street corners with signs reading, "The End is Now" or "Repent!" It's a cute caricature, but very dated. These days harbingers of the apocalypse - especially Christian fundamentalists - are getting their message out via Twitter, Facebook, pamphlets, radio shows and billboards.

It's not clear what, exactly, the public is supposed to do with this information. Most people perhaps respond with a shrug, assuming that it's another failed religious doomsday prediction. Others may assume that that if the world really is going to end soon, there's not much point in worrying about it.

Though mainstream churches have typically shied away from predicting that Armageddon is imminent (or its date even knowable), plenty of self-styled prophets believe they know the real truth. One of them is Harold Camping, the 89-year-old leader of the ministry Family Radio Worldwide, whose study of the Bible has convinced him and his followers that the world will end on May 21, 2011. Actually, the complete destruction may take up to six months, but certainly no one should make plans for Thanksgiving or Christmas.

 
44% of Americans See Natural Disasters as Sign of End Times
March 25, 2011
america natural disaster god religion

According to just over half of Americans, God is in control of everything that happens on Earth. But slightly fewer are willing to blame an omnipotent power for natural disasters such as Japan's earthquake and tsunami.

A new poll finds that 56 percent of Americans agree or mostly agree that God is in control of all Earthly events. Forty-four percent think that natural disasters are or could be a sign from the Almighty. The fire-and-brimstone version of a vengeful God is even less popular in America: Only 29 percent of people felt that God sometimes punishes an entire nation for the sins of a few individuals.

Nonetheless, the desire to turn to God for an explanation after a disaster is a widespread human urge, said Scott Schieman, a sociologist at the University of Toronto who studies people's beliefs about God's influence on daily life. "There's just something about the randomness of the universe that is too unsettling," Schieman told LiveScience. "We like explanations for why things happen … many times people weave in these divine narratives." [ LIVE SCIENCE ]

 
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